Facebook  Twitter       

Caberet

Jesters of Jive in Zoot Suit Boogie
The magic of the Jive era comes alive, when Zoot Suits were the rage and Swing was King! Zoot Suit Boogie is a horn driven celebration of 1940's Jump-Jive and revival swing with hot vocals, killer horns, dancers, celebrity impersonators, toe tappin' grooves & a smokin' 8 piece band!

Visit the Jesters of Jive website at: www.JestersofJive.com

Back to Top

Joe Battaglia and the
New York Big Band

Joan is honored to sing with this amazing 17 piece big band. Acclaimed as one of the finest Big Bands in the Country today. The quality of this band is reminiscent of the big band era, with a repertoire including sophisticated dance, jazz, and latin music. The band has had much success performing at New York's, Lincoln Centers Midsummer Night Swing, Supper Club, and political fundraisers for Hillary Clinton, Rudy Giuliani, and Barbra Walters. The band has performed at the Rainbow Room and the Tavern on the Green in Central Park and is currently the house band at the Edison Ballroom.

Back to Top

In the Key Of Comedy is a high energy, eclectic mix of the Great American Songbook, vintage jazz and contemporary offbeat tunes with a sense of humor. Crowe is "a slightly twisted and superbly talented chanteuse," wrote Tom Staudter in The New York Times, whose self proclaimed mission is to "inject a little humor into the world of jazz."

Buy the new album, click here

Back to Top

WOMEN OF NOTE is a 90-minute show that salutes 100 years of the sung but often unsung women songwriters of the 20th century, from Bessie Smith to Bonnie Raitt. This show was specifically designed for women’s studies programs and women’s organizations. “For our annual fundraiser, we wanted something different from our usual guest speaker. WOMEN OF NOTE fit the bill. It was not only wonderfully entertaining but also inspiring.”-- WAWBO (Westchester Association of Woman’s Business Owners) The focus is on a select group of 20 women songwriters, their inspirations, their lives, and how one generation of women allowed the next generation’s voice to emerge. There are plenty of familiar and recognizable tunes in the show to appreciate as well as some wonderful works by lesser-known women. Audiences are always surprised that women wrote some of the world’s most recognizable songs, from “Happy Birthday,” by sisters Patty Smith Hill and Mildred Hill, to “America the Beautiful” and the “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” by Katherine Lee Bates and Julia Ward Howe, respectively.

Following the opening number, “Ask Me,” a song about relying on women to get the job done, written by contemporary songwriter Babbie Green, the show segues to a Bessie Smith-written song from the turn of the 19th century. Smith’s “Sugar in My Bowl” is a subtle and sultry song that celebrates a woman’s sexuality. The show moves through the century. It makes stops in Tin Pan Alley with the wonderful Dorothy Fields, continues through the 50’s with the fabulous Peggy Lee and on to the girl groups of the 60's and the singer/songwriters of the 70's, like Joni Mitchell and Carol King. Joans also acknowledges two women role models in her personal life with “Petite Southern Woman,” a song she wrote as a tribute to her mother-in-law, and Janis Ian’s “Tattoo,” a song she sings in tribute to her mother who survived a German prison camp.

This show is best with piano, bass and drums but can be performed with just piano when budget dictates. Click here to read Back Stage review.

Back to Top

Along with wonderful singer Sue Matsuki, Jay Leonhart and the rest of the band, they are five, jazz, jive jesters as they team up...to rip it up.both musically & hysterically! Featuring some songs written and performed by the Master Jazz Jester himself...Mr. Jay Leonhart...who the Jazz Times calls: "the Fred Astaire of Jazz". Do not miss the opportunity to book this extraordinary, celebration of some of the funniest, jazz songwriters of our day like: Bob Dorough; Dave Frishberg; Marcy Heisler & Zina Goldrich; Mary Liz McNamara along with the historic, hipsters like Fats Waller, Cab Callaway, Louis Jordan; Tommy Wolf, and MORE.you'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll swing, you'll jive and then you'll laugh some more! Be there or be square Daddy-O!

"Crowe & Matsuki make a modern day Hope & Crosby with sharp comic timing."
Dave Hurst, Show Business

Back to Top

IrreverantIRREVERANT was originally titled "Irreverent at the Iridium" as it was first performed at the Iridium Jazz Club in New York City and then shortened for performances at the Jazz Standard and subsequent venues. This show features music by Songwriters like Dave Frishberg, Randy Newman, Jay Leonhart, and others who combine jazz chops with humor and a dash of civil disobedience. Sometimes it's the musical arrangements that are irreverent, like putting a reggae groove on the old show tune Sit Down You're Rocking the Boat, or the song lyrics themselves could be the source, like the hysterical White Girl Blues. This wickedly funny evening is not for the faint of heart as Crowe takes shots at religion, politics, sexuality even Disney Land.

Back to Top

The Devil in Miss Joan is the winner of the 2002 MAC Award (Manhattan Association of Cabaret and Clubs) for Best Female Comedy. This show was directed by cabaret legend Mark Nadler and was the beginning of her collaboration with jazz wunderkind Tedd Firth as Musical Director. (Accompaniment: piano only)

This 60-minute show is a funny and often poignant look at good and evil. “Hilarious” declared the Associated Press. Peter Leavy writes in Cabaret Scenes “Irreverent would be a mild description. Joan’s take on good and (primarily) evil was so amusing and absorbing that it is easy to overlook what a lovely voice this lanky, leggy siren possesses.” In a review of her performance of this show at The Manor in New Jersey, Bill VanSant of The Essex Journal wrote “After beginning the show in a white choir robe, singing “Jesus Loves Me,” the devilishly divine Miss Joan tossed her pristine raiment aside to reveal a slinking, beaded red gown, the perfect attire for the songs to follow. Her “I Want to Be Evil” got things in gear with it bluesy, gritty feel. “I Love to Smoke,” a tongue-in-cheek tribute to lighting up, followed before Crowe propped herself atop the grand piano and turned a flower vase into an impromptu hookah. Combining the giddy soul of Fats Waller’s “Viper Drag” with the slinkiness of Michelle Pfeiffer in “The Fabulous Baker Boys, “ Crowe committed her ultimate musical blasphemy—“It’s Good to be God” by Charles Bloom—proving her razor-sharp wit is on an equal footing with her vocal prowess. … “A wonder to behold, Joan Crowe will have you laughing one minute and dabbing at tears the next…” Click here for the complete review.

Back to Top

As the Crowe Flies was dubbed "Fabulous!" by Bloomberg Radio and earned Joan a second MAC Award nomination, for Best Female Musical Comedy. This show features piano, electric guitar and drums and is more of a pop/rock show with music from the Beatles and Annie Lennox among others. Jan Wallman of Applause Applause wrote: “She can do it all in several styles. She’s at home with contemporary pop, has a strong jazz feeling and the voice to move you with a serious ballad plus the timing to tickle you with comedy.” And Richard Edgecomb of WDVR raved: “Joan Crowe flies and has crafted a thrilling show.” See complete review-press room

Back to Top

Shooting Stars garnered Joan her first MAC Award nomination for Best Female Debut. Time Out NewYork magazine chose her as the "critics pick" of the month and did a feature article about Joan and the show. The show also received very favorable reviews from Back Stage, In Theatre, The Village Voice, and Cabaret Scenes. This show holds a special place in Joan’s heart as it features the music of her dear friend Tom Brown because she didn't want his beautiful and funny music to be forgotten after his death. Click here to read a review

Back to Top

 

This jazz site is part of